Denmark and Germany lead bioenergy and solar power markets in Europe

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9 September 2014, Nuclear, Solar, Wind

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European countries' bioenergy rankings in 2014:

1. Denmark - 15.4%
2. Finland - 11.6%
3. Sweden - 8.9%
4. Germany - 7.5%
5. Austria - 7.1%
6. UK - 5.6%
7. Portugal - 5.5%
8. Belgium - 5.4%

Excluding Portugal, the leading European countries for bioenergy are all northern. Denmark, Finland, and Sweden have been quick to adopt bioenergy, taking advantage of their abundant organic materials and implementing financial incentives for energy providers to convert coal-fired plants to bioenergy. By 2030, Denmark will increase its bioenergy capacity further to provide over 40% of its energy consumption. Sweden is also projected to increase its bioenergy generation from 8.9% in 2014 to 12.6% by 2030, thus moving into second place in the rankings.

European countries' solar energy market rankings in 2014:
1. Germany - 6.7%
2. Italy - 6.6%
3. Spain - 5.1%
4. Czech Republic - 3.2%
5. Belgium - 1.8%
6. Denmark - 1.7%
7. France - 1.4%
8. Portugal - 1.0%

Germany has been a pioneer in the solar market for the last decade, taking over from Japan's efforts in the 1990s. Although Italy and Spain both receive greater amounts of sun, Germany's consistent feed-in-tariff policy has allowed its national market and solar companies to flourish. Nevertheless, Italy is projected to overtake Germany by 2030, increasing its share of solar power generation in energy consumption from 6.6% in 2014 to 11.3% by 2030. Another notable change will be France moving from seventh with 1.4% in 2014 to fourth with 4.8% by 2030.

Both bioenergy and solar power generation lag behind hydro and wind power in the European countries analyzed, but despite this 13.1% of German, French, British, Italian, and Spanish energy consumption will be accounted for by bioenergy and solar power by 2030.


www.datamonitorenergy.com / asken@datamonitor.com / @DatamonitorEN

Source: MarketLine

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